Tuesday, February 28, 2017

February Retrospective


1) Ember Falls by S.D. Smith


I read The Green Ember aloud to the kids this summer and they loved it. I got Elspeth the next in the series for Christmas and as soon as she finished reading it,  she couldn't wait for me to read it. I wish we had read it aloud together because these are fun to share. One of the endorsements on the back says that this book does for The Green Ember what The Empire Strikes Back did for Star Wars. I thought that was a great way to put it! I can't wait for the one that acts like Return of the Jedi!


2) If I Was Your Girl by Meredith Russo


This is a book about a transgender teen living in the Deep South. Fortunately, the author is a transgender Southerner and treated the South fairly- as a Southerner outside of the South, I get frustrated with the South being villainized. I chose this book because it was another on Amazon's list of the top young adult books from 2016. The author's point of view, and therefore the book's point of view, is that people deserve happiness. This is not my point of view, not my worldview so to speak, and that was helpful to identify as a fundamental difference between the way I think the world should work and the way our culture thinks the world should work. I wish we could remember this in our conversations with people who believe differently than us- we are not on the same wavelength and so no wonder things get mixed up and people get hurt.


3) After You by Julie Buxbaum


I chose this book because I had liked Buxbaum's YA book Tell Me Three Things. I liked this book for the most part. It is about a woman named Ellie whose best friend dies and leaves an eight-year-old daughter named Sophie behind. Ellie is Sophie's godmother and moves to London from Boston to be with Sophie but leaves her husband behind in Boston. As time passes, some things become easier and some things become harder.

4) The Secret Garden by Frances Hodgson Burnett


I had never actually read this book before. Amabel loaned me her copy and actually teared up telling me what a good book it was when she brought it to me. I knew it was her favorite but I actually chose it because Ellie reads it to Sophie in After You to help her process her grief. It is a delightful book. There is a reason it is such popular children's classic. But reading it as an adult raises questions about the worldview presented that a child wouldn't likely ask. Once again, I found myself disagreeing with the perspective presented. Even if one replaces "God" for "Magic," it still doesn't work with the idea that it doesn't matter what you call "The Big Good Thing." If belief in Jesus' death and resurrection and a life committed to following him is necessary, then it certainly does matter. I am guessing that Amabel likely brought her own understanding into the book when she read it as a child, but Amabel's understanding of the Gospel is not represented in this book at all- which is totally fine, many many good books have no representation of the Gospel-- it's just that this book is extremely religious in nature and the religion represented is not Christianity.

5) The Sea Keeper's Daughters by Lisa Wingate




I was a little discouraged after reading so much that was not in line with my worldview, so I went to The Christy Awards website to find a good Christian fiction book. I chose the 2016 winner for contemporary fiction. But sadly, as is often the case with Christian music, the standard for excellence seemed to be a little off. From the beginning, it was clear the book was over written. There were way too many descriptions, way too many lists of things- the book just needed a good editor. I believe it was Faulkner who first said "kill your darlings." And Stephen King humorously added "...even when it breaks your egocentric little scribbler's heart , kill your darlings." I can only guess that neither Wingate nor her editor got the memo. Whew! Then there are the hackneyed plot devices. There are old letters that have been hidden for years. There are villainous property developers who care nothing for people or history. There is a lot of sudden bursts of emotion that induce running away and crying. And the use of dreams as messages is also a serious problem for me. I wasted a whole lot of time reading this so I don't really want to waste even more writing about it. It was really really bad. We'll leave it at that.

6) Falling Together by Marisa de los Santos


This is another gem by de los Santos and I think I am officially a fan. This was my favorite of hers yet. What a treat to in the last two days of a month of generally disappointing reading to find such a genuinely warm and hopeful story that actually has a moral compass. De Los Santos generally seems to have a measure of morality that is so refreshing in today's cultural climate. Today's cultural climate. Gag. On both the phrase but also the thing it represents. Our culture is bumming me out big time lately. But Marisa de los Santos makes me smile. Highly recommended.

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